Erin Ward: January Featured Artist at Beside The Wave Gallery

A spotlight on Acrylic painter Erin Ward. Erin’s paintings are inspired from visits to coastal regions, particularly the East Coast, Cornwall, and Norfolk, spending time walking the coastal paths. Areas where the sea meets the land and rivers, where salt water meets fresh water are a fascination, as well as hard rock against water, the meeting of two extremes.

Erin paints in an energetic, semi-abstract way using a limited palette; often mixing the colours directly onto the canvas, using rags, palette knives and sometimes her fingers, building up the paint from transparent washes to thick impasto in focal areas. We caught up with Erin to find out more about the collection.

Your paintings are full of energy and movement, how do you capture that emotion within your work from memory?

My energetic mark-making is my style which has developed over the years and I find if I am remembering a place, it’s usually from a sense of atmosphere or the weather so it usually works out fine.

What started your connection with Cornwall? Did you visit as a child?

I first visited Cornwall as a child on a family holiday and that memory stayed with me, but it wasn’t until my early twenties when I went on my own and walked the coastal paths did my love for Cornwall really start to develop. I have since returned as often as I can to walk and sketch and soak up the wonderful light and landscape.

What draws you to using acrylic paint in your work?

Acrylics are hugely versatile but are also non-toxic and the artist quality paints use lightfast pigments. They are fantastic to use to create thick impasto areas which still dry quickly but their versatility means that you can also use them in thin layers to give a watercolour effect and also to build up glazes.

They do dry quickly but I also work fairly quickly and it’s a good challenge to get those lovely impasto marks down in one go.

Light Overhead

Light Overhead, Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61 cms, £1,400 – view online

What do you want the viewer to feel from your paintings?

I would love viewers to connect to a sense of atmosphere, and a sense of place in my paintings but mainly I would want them to take away an emotional response.

Do you have a favourite painting within the collection at Beside The Wave Gallery?

That is a difficult question! Each of the pieces in the collection means something different to me but if I could choose two, it would be ‘Empty Beach’ for it’s quiet, calming atmosphere and then ‘Rolling In’ for the dynamic marks, colour and energy, so they are complete opposites!

Rolling InRolling In, Acrylic on canvas, 76.2 x 76.2 cms, £1,950 – view online

Who have been your influences whilst developing your artistic career?

Turner had a very early influence on me. I remember pouring over his watercolour studies for a project in school.

More recently I have been looking at the work of women painters of the Abstract Expressionism movement, in particular, Joan Mitchell, whose work I adore. I think I’m attracted to her energy and movement which plays a big part in my own work.

I also love the work of David Tress, whom I think is one of Britan’s best contemporary landscape artists.

How has your work developed over the years and what direction do you see your work going for the future?

My creative journey has been long and varied and it is only in the past 12 years that I feel my work is going in a direction that I am happy with, although there are still many ups and downs! I tried using acrylics, loved their versatility and ease of use, and as I became comfortable using them as my main medium (I still work in watercolours and oils) my painting flourished. Seascapes, landscape and the weather have always been my main inspiration and this doesn’t show any signs of changing, but I’m finding that my style has become more abstract and my once very limited palette has started to include brighter, richer colours which I’m finding very exciting. I also want to try to capture the energy and motion in my work onto larger canvases and so I have started practising on large pieces of paper first.

Tide Rushing In

Tide Rushing In, Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61 cms, £1,400 – view online

View the full collection of paintings online here.

Benjamin Warner: Influences for Abstract painting collection

Kenneth Warner, Benjamin’s father was a huge influence on his decision to approach abstract work, what started as a collaboration of surfaces has flourished into a huge part of Benjamin’s own artistic practice. In February 2018, Beside the Wave exhibited a collection of abstract paintings by Warner for the very first time across both gallery spaces; the collection received much admiration from collectors old and new.

Benjamin Warner’s abstract paintings are a powerful combination of highly worked surfaces and clever composition which both indicate an almost Abstract Expressionist intention, as well as a constructivist understanding of shape and form. With an innate comprehension of the visual identity of how a painting works, these abstract paintings masterfully adhere to the golden ration. The Golden Ratio has been used as a powerful composition tool for centuries, hailed as ‘the perfect number’, it can assist in creating images that have a strong effect. Benjamin uses this tool as a way of allowing compositional components to speak for themselves and push geometric shapes in and out of focus for the viewer. By using geometric forms but slightly blurring their edges and keeping shapes loose, Benjamin achieves a sense of these floating forms existing across the picture plane. Judging when a piece is finished is a balancing act in the studio for Benjamin, he often leaves paintings for months before returning and finishing them. By achieving what he calls a ‘sense of rhythm and belonging’ this is the marker Benjamin strives for when finishing a piece.

Dance, 30.5 x 46 cm, oil on board, £1,050
Dance, Oil on board, 30.5 x 46 cms, £1,050 – view online

In terms of visual influences, Benjamin takes inspiration from his surroundings whether that is shapes he sees on television programmes or how something is pulled together in landscape. His starting points are incredibly varied but there is always a moment where the painting begins to dictate itself and move away from the original starting point. Not only do their elemental construction reference a formalist approach to painting, Benjamin’s abstracts take influence from the St. Ives artists working through the 1930s- especially Roger Hilton with his palette and then Patrick Heron with his shapes. With an emphasis on materiality, simple line and accentuated forms, both the St. Ives painters and Warner prioritise the construction of a painting as very much on show, there is no illusion and the painting becomes its own visual history with densely built layers of oils.

Click Clack, 30.5 x 43.5 cm, oil on board, £995
Click Clack, Oil on Board, 30.5 x 43.5 cms, £995 – view online

The roughened quality of not only the paint application but also surface material, allows Benjamin to produce paintings where there is a unification between artist and artwork. There is an implication that Warner works with the surface instead of dictatorially working on the surface which exposes a truly intuitive handling of medium. With both the act of painting and unpainting (removing), Warner’s work insists on a sense of longevity and timelessness which allows the viewer to experience the painting as an autonomous object- existing with its own essence. By often scraping layers of paint back, Benjamin’s work carries a trace or a ghost of what has gone before it therefore giving it a more impactful final effect. With the lack of concrete subject matter, the paintings could be deemed a surface level, modern creation; however, Warner does not disregard the historical codes and conventions of the painting model. In fact, he uses many tools such as impasto, colour theory and traditional application which reveal his complex understanding of the painting world. Through adapting these methods and tools slightly to his own approach and the removal of an obvious subject matter, Benjamin’s abstracts allow for a more sublime, emotional response. This is then often emphasised by the titling of the work, both constructed before and after a painting is made, the language Benjamin uses is both poetic and descriptive. Either derived from real place names or from an emotional experience, the titles act as a nudge in the right direction for the viewer rather than explicitly signposting-they give them an identity without dictating a prescriptive viewing.

Balance and tension are both present in these abstract pieces, with sliding forms buffering against one in another in slight tonal differences, the paintings ask the viewer to fill in the gaps with their own imagination and experience. Colour, although not vivid or primary, plays a strong role in Benjamin’s work as it acts as a vehicle to reference things in our surrounding world. By splitting composition through colour and line, Warner’s work also holds a textile quality, sharing characteristics with artists such as Sandra Blow with her woven like compositions in similar colours that profoundly blurred the lines between object and painting. Both Warner and Blow, use colour as a way of producing abstract, geometric pictures which emphasise patterns, tones and shapes found in the elemental world. Benjamin’s work shows a substantial comprehension of the need for varied pigmentation and saturation within a painting, he does this by using umbers and ochres across the background and middle ground which is then often dramatically altered with the interruption of a blue or orange gesture. With this combination of muted earth tones and an occasional vibrant insertion, Benjamin’s work can speak of the landscape he exists in, both urban and natural. There is also a balance between Warner’s abstract and representational work, each practice informs the other and allows Benjamin to move forward with both sets of paintings. The abstract work allows for a more in-depth experimentation and learning curve in terms of material and surface which then can be translated into the representational works, they keep each other fresh and exciting.

Spatial I (Green)

Spatial I (Green), Oil on board, 15 x 14 cms, £395 – view online

The idea that a piece of art can both reference the visual world we live in through abstract forms which we recognise, but also can avoid being too indicative of specificities and box viewers in, is not a new revelation. However, we believe abstract art has become even more relevant in our ever-changing world. With the over stimulation of visual imagery and an instantaneous culture, abstract art acts as the reminder that we can exist in a slower and more indefinite manner. Benjamin Warner’s work is an intense yet generous dialogue between colour and form, both of which are always rooted in him as a person and what he visually encounters in his everyday life. He is an artist of our time that is saving abstraction from a clinical or remote dynamic and is instead lurching it towards association and emotion.

View the full collection of Benjamin Warner Abstract Paintings available at Beside The Wave Gallery online here.

Works on Paper: 20th April – 3rd May 2018

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We have a selection of new Andrew Tozer drawings in especially for this exhibition

This new group show celebrates the varying ways in which artists present works on paper. Featuring copper etchings, pen and inks, mixed media and an imposing charcoal completed on the spot!

Artists’ work displayed includes Nigel Chamberlain, Nancy Crewe, Miles Heseltine, Sarah Woods, Andrew Tozer and Richard Tuff.

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Some new Sarah Woods etchings can also be seen in this show.

We are delighted to be introducing new gallery artist Hugo Jones. Hugo grew up in Cornwall, where he developed a deep love for the landscape and its inhabitants. The people in the portraits are friends, family and himself; he enjoys trying to capture expression and movement, whilst also being true to human form.

He is always looking to improve his knowledge of anatomy, by studying from books and attending life drawing classes. His work tries to bridge the gap between traditional methods, and more modern expressive ideas.

To see Hugo’s work visit our website here 

 

This exhibition is open until the 3rd May, don’t miss it!

Christmas at Beside The Wave 24th November 2017 – 3rd January 2018

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Our annual Christmas show is now open at the gallery and available to view online. With over 30 different artists’ work on display we’re sure that you’ll be able to find something for those you love, or a new addition to your own home with many pieces under £500. The show includes brand new work by Nancy Crewe, Emma Dunbar, Helen Jones, Myles Oxenford and Richard Tuff.

We are also excited to be showing etchings by the artist Sarah Woods who is new to the gallery for this show. Sarah is a recent graduate from Falmouth University where she studied a BA (Hons) in Fine Art from 2013-2016.

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Empty Skies by Sarah Woods
Etching
36 x 29 cms
£185

‘I am a painter and printmaker documenting the landscape through mixed media and re-working materials. My prints are largely informed by an obsession with line, creating repetitive marks whilst abstracting and refining initial observations. This is explored through paintings that are sewn and engraved, altering the surface and emphasising the materials used.

Perception, reception and response are key processes in the translation of the landscape. Reversing the use of materials and questioning the order of the work inspires my practice and encourages an experimental approach, stripped of material and methodical in process.’ – Sarah Woods

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New Richard Tuff gouache paintings now up at the front of the gallery.

We hope you can make it to see this show over December, we have a range of ceramics and jewellery too which can be seen on our website. We would like to wish you a very happy festive season ahead and hope you enjoy this carefully curated Christmas collection.

Christmas Parties at Beside The Wave Galleries 

Our annual Christmas events will be taking place at Beside The Wave London on Thursday 30th November and here in Falmouth on Thursday 7th December. We very much hope to see you in either gallery.

Composition and Colour: 3rd – 24th November 2017

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Here’s a peak at some fabulous new work by Ali Tomlin, Anne-Marie Butlin, Emma Dunbar and Sue Binns.

This very special group show is a celebration of four artist’s ability to combine colour, texture and form to produce exquisite works of art. From Anne-Marie Butlin’s traditional still life’s depicting hand picked flowers in a Sue Binns’ vase to Emma Dunbar’s eclectic and playful compositions featuring an Ali Tomlin pot with her distinctive scribble.

With impressive and extensive careers to date, we feel privileged to represent these artists. Each have been shown throughout the UK, have been featured in several publications and now have an international following of collectors.

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Our window display for Composition and Colour, full of Ali Tomlin and Sue Binns ceramics as well as Anne-Marie Butlin and Emma Dunbar paintings. 

Anne-Marie Butlin trained at Harrow and Loughborough College of Art.
She now lives and works in Crouch End, North London. Her work is
exhibited all over the country and has been show at Art Fairs in
Amsterdam and the USA. She also regularly works on portrait
commissions.

‘I paint mostly still life with fruit, flowers ceramics, patterned fabrics and
various domestic objects in still, calm interiors. I love the character of
different flowers and the unique feeling they can create in a space; the
strong structures and sometimes the sheer joyfullness of their
appearance. Although I often use the same shallow format, I like the
different possibilities of the still life.
My colours range from the subtle, with close tones, to strong and
decorative. I usually use a strong base colour, which I allow to show
through in places; this gives many of the paintings quite a jewel-like feel.’
Anne-Marie Butlin

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Delphiniums | oil on linen | 100 x 100 cms | £3,350 | by Anne-Marie Butlin

Born in England in 1961, Emma Dunbar graduated in 1984 with a BA Hons
in Fine Art Printmaking from West Surrey College of Art and Design. Since
then she has worked full time as an artist and exhibited throughout the UK.
Emma’s inspiration comes from travelling in India, Cornish holidays and the
chaos of family life. Also, the work of her favourite artists, including Mary
Fedden, Milton Avery and Daphne McClure.

“What excited me about making pictures is trying to capture the essence of
a place, a feeling, a thing. I am attracted to vivid colours and the decorative
qualities of everyday objects. My aim is to end up with my gathered
ingredients – glimpses of journeys, patterns from familiar settings and
objects collected along the way – converging to create an image that
communicates the richness of the original source of inspiration.’ – Emma Dunbar.

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Early Autumn Blackbirds | acrylic on board | 30 x 30 cms | £575 | by Emma Dunbar 

Sue’s skills as a potter are largely self taught but she had an inspirational few years under the guidance of Ian Godfrey at the Montem School in the 1980?s. Since then her work has been evolving and she has produced a wide range of functional domestic stoneware.
The distinctive patterns are produced by brushing dilute cobalt over the dolomite glaze before firing to 1240 degrees centigrade. The seemingly endless combinations of stripes that dominate my work are carefully chosen to suit each individual piece.

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Vases by Sue Binns 

Ali Tomlin has always drawn and designed and loves the energy of random lines or marks, from a sketch, painting or found on stones or peeling paint. She enjoys how just a simple line can completely change the feeling of a piece.

Her work is a collection of thrown, uncluttered porcelain forms. She throws and turns the pieces to a fine finish which, when unglazed and sanded, gives the porcelain a paper-like, tactile quality, where she applies her marks as spontaneously as possible. Preferring to work on the dry, chalky surface, she uses stains, oxides and slips, splashing or sponging away areas and inlaying lines, creating pleasingly imperfect and unpredictable marks. Sometimes this results in simple graphic marks and sometimes never ending abstract, landscape paintings or cityscapes, wrapping around the pots.
We hope you are able to join us in the gallery for what promises to be a striking, richly coloured and joyful exhibition of these incredibly talented artist’s work.

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Ali Tomlin bowls 

We hope you are able to join us in the gallery for what promises to be a striking, richly coloured and joyful exhibition of these incredibly talented artist’s work.

New Ceramics by Catherine Lucktaylor and Mary-Rose Young now in our Falmouth gallery.

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New ceramics in the gallery by Catherine Lucktaylor 

We are excited to announce we now have a new selection of ceramics by Catherine Lucktaylor and Mary-Rose Young in the gallery.

Catherine creates hand built ceramics in her studio at Bejowans Farm near St Buryan, West Cornwall. She uses time honoured techniques such as coiling, pinching and slabbing to create stunning statement pieces. These exquisitely crafted, one of a kind, pinched and coiled bowls and vessels which embody the wild beauty of the Cornish landscape are made using hand rolled coils of clay. The surface of the pots are burnished to a silky sheen with the use of a smooth pebble before being bisque fired to 1000 degrees centigrade.

A selection of vibrant crackle glazes and slip resist techniques along with Catherine’s signature turquoise glaze are applied to the pots. They are then fired in an outside Raku Kiln, which Catherine made herself, to around 950 degrees centigrade. Pieces are removed from the kiln with tongs whilst glowing red hot smoked in sawdust before being cleaned to reveal the unpredictable beauty of Raku glazed ceramics.

Working from home, Mary-Rose Young began selling pottery pieces from a barrow at the Dockside Arts Centre, in Bristol, from about 1985. Her earliest designs included the humorous ‘frantic chicken’ and a rose motif which seemed appropriate next to her name. The roses began to grow in a three-dimensional form on the rims of vases and on the handles of mugs, and she called the look ‘Rose Encrusted’.

In 1986 production moved to a small pottery in the village of Parkend. Early recognition of her work at this time came in the form of a magazine article for South West Arts, an interview with Jan Leeming for TV, and acceptance by the Crafts Council for her application to exhibit at the Chelsea Crafts Fair.

Contact us at gallery@beside-the-wave.co.uk if you would like any information on these new ceramics.

Loving Vincent Screening at The Poly, Falmouth, followed by Q&A with Sarah Wimperis

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A few frames that Sarah Wimperis painted for Loving Vincent

Loving Vincent is the world’s first fully painted feature film which brings the paintings and subjects of Vincent van Gogh to life to tell his remarkable story. It follows the last few days of the Dutch Master’s passionate and ill-fated life to his mysterious death in July 1890.

As the only English oil-painter among a 125-strong global team of artists, working in Poland and Greece on this extraordinary animated film, Helford-based Sarah Wimperis became immersed in the themes, style and world of Van Gogh.

On Monday 20 November The Poly, in association with Beside the Wave gallery, will be hosting a special Cornish premiere for Loving Vincent – with a chance to meet the artist over a glass of wine beforehand at Beside the Wave Falmouth. Sarah will then be on stage at The Poly, after the screening, to answer all audience questions.

This special Loving Vincent evening starts from 5.30pm – 7pm at Beside the Wave Falmouth on Monday 20 November; the film itself begins at 7.30pm along the road at The Poly with a Q & A session with Sarah Wimperis immediately afterwards.

Sarah will also be taking questions following the second screening of the film on Tuesday 21 November at 7.30pm.

For more information about Loving Vincent and Sarah Wimperis’s contribution to it, see http://www.beside-the-wave.co.uk/exhibitions/1159/sarah-wimperis-light-and-heat

Jamie Medlin: Prints now in stock

 

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Autumn at Kynance| print | 25.4 x 74.3 cms| £120| by Jamie Medlin.

We are thrilled to announce we now have a selection of 10 limited edition prints and a original painting by the highly acclaimed artist Jamie Medlin in the gallery and online.

Now Based in Cornwall, Jamie’s time painting is split between his two favourite subjects – seascapes and yachting. There has been continued success with his yacht paintings at Christies in London where he auctions in their Maritime sales; and along with this, regularly exhibits with his London gallery – Rountree Tryon. This exposure has led to a worldwide following and commissions from some of the biggest marine collectors in the world, with a host of publications featuring Jamie’s work. All of his limited edition prints are from original oil paintings on canvas.

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Pudding Rock| oil on canvas| by Jamie Medlin

“More recently I have returned to painting the scenes and views within our wonderful county.  The simple aim is to do justice to the beauty which has inspired people forever and continues to bring people back to visit, (who are not lucky enough to live here), year after year.  I’m fascinated by the nuances of light, from minute to minute; affected by the time of day, weather conditions, seasons and tides.  All these factors combine to create an infinite possibility of effects and scenes, all of which can be pleasing to the viewer.  Cornwall’s beauty is unquestionably stunning, if I can replicate it, my job is almost done.” – Jamie Medlin

Adrian Hemming: In Search of Snow-13th October-1st November 2017.

Our new exhibition ‘In Search of Snow’ by Adrian Hemming is now up in the gallery!

We are delighted to be hosting our first collection for highly acclaimed and collected artist Adrian Hemming in our Falmouth gallery.’In search Of Snow’ is open from 13th October – 1st November 2017. This collection consists of twelve paintings of the mountains of Abruzzo, Italy, where Adrian studied the energetic landscape.

Adrian Hemming was born in Leicester in 1945. Following an engineering apprenticeship he travelled widely in Europe and developed an appreciation of landscape and a love of art. On returning to England, Adrian was accepted onto the Foundation Course at Lincoln College of Art. His B.A. was completed at Brighton Polytechnic (1973) and his M.A. at Goldsmiths College, London University (1982).

Adrian has twice been short-listed for the Artist in Residence at the National Gallery, London. He has lectured and exhibited widely in England, Scotland, America and South Africa. His work can be found in many private and public collections as well as being on public view in Terminal One, Heathrow Airport, as a result of a major commission by BAA.

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A new collection of Tuff gouache paintings and pen and inks.

Alongside this collection we have a mixed collection by some of our gallery artists as well as a new collection of Richard Tuff gouache paintings and pen and ink drawings up in the gallery. All of these new works can be seen on our website.