Miles Heseltine: Hillsides and Headlands 26th May – 14th June 2017

Our new solo show by Miles Heseltine is now up in both our cornwall and London galleries. We would like to say a massive thank you to everyone who came to the Private View in Falmouth with Miles in attendance.

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Gallery Director Ingrid and Beside The Wave Falmouth Manager Florence alongside Miles Heseltine on the private view night in our Falmouth gallery
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Viewers admiring Mile’s large Diptych

Miles Heseltine’s reputation as a distinguished part of the contemporary Cornish art scene has been very well earnt. This artist is often found on monumental cliff tops with a colossal sheet of paper rolled out in front of him, stones used to anchor the corners to the rugged ground, working intuitively and quickly to capture a particular moment. His approach seeks out essences such as rhythm and suggestions of form, filtering what he sees in front of him to the awe-inspiring elements that have stopped him in his tracks during his daily walks. This inspiration is carried home to his studio and into his thickly layered paintings. The immediacy and energy from his process is distinctively evident throughout his work; with confidently applied brushstrokes, laden with oil paint, reliving the gestural sweeps of charcoal from those moments in the landscape.
This solo exhibition marks 10 years since the artist’s inclusion in the ground-breaking exhibition ‘Revolver’ at the Penzance Art Gallery, grouping Miles with other young mid-career artists that together represented a new confidence and attitude in the contemporary Cornish art scene.

This show is definetely for lovers of expressive mark making and impasto painting and is not to be missed!

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Pendeen Watch From Bosigran Head | charcoal on paper | 130 x 340 cms | £4450 | by Miles Heseltine

To see all works featured in Mile’s show follow the link to our exhibition page here:

http://www.beside-the-wave.co.uk/exhibitions/1119/miles-heseltine-hillsides-and-headlands

FRESH: Contemporary Art Fair 11th-14th May 2017

We have taken part in FRESH Art Fair 2017! This exciting new art fair took place at Cheltenham racecourse and featured numerous galleries from across the country coming together to show a great variety of art. This fair was a huge success for us and we would like to say a big thank you to everyone who organised this event and came to visit us whilst we were there. We can’t wait till next time!

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Our London gallery manager Claire and Beside The Wave Director Ingrid showing customers a wonderful Jon Doran painting at FRESH Art Fair 2017

Beside The Wave at Chelsea Art Fair 27th-30th April 2017.

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We are thrilled to be taking part in this year’s Chelsea Art Fair at The Chelsea Town Hall. We see this as a fantastic opportunity to connect with other galleries across the UK and to show our unique and wonderful artists that we represent at the gallery.

This year we are featuring an array of our gallery artists at our stand including work by: Kerry Harding, Miles Heseltine, Ashley Hold, Alasdair Lindsay, Myles Oxenford, Hector Trend, Andrew Tozer, Erin Ward, Benjamin Warner and Sarah Wimperis. We are also showcasing sculpture by Peter Hayes and the ceramics of Paul Jackson for the first time.

 

Richard Tuff – Colours of Cornwall a solo exhibition 14th April – 3rd May 2017.

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Cottages at Helford |by Richard Tuff | gouache on paper | 38 x 48 cms | £1,150

 

Here at Beside The Wave Cornwall, we are thrilled to be hosting our 25th solo show for the widely renowned and highly collected artist, Richard Tuff.
After 28 years of representation, it’s hard to believe there are any Cornish coves, cottages or harbours left that haven’t been depicted by Tuff; constantly seeking out inspiration in his surroundings and developing his celebrated distinctive style. In Tuff’s work, change is not forced. Through exposure to new landscapes, he has discovered that the process of painting furthers itself.

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His latest collection combines classic Cornish scenes of Helford, Durgan and Mylor with views of simple greenhouses and courtyards. In Tuff’s playful compositions we see canoes propped up against a harbour wall, plants lining shelves and boats bobbing outside the Pandora.

Rendering the complexity of a view into abstract simplicity, and rebuilding it into a figurative image is what Tuff does best. Unlike many landscape painters whose focus is on capturing the moment – and particularly the light in a landscape- his work expresses a place ‘in essence’. Almost the alchemist, Tuff absorbs landscapes through repeated exposure to them and then draws them out layer by layer in the studio.

At Beside The Wave, we feel hugely proud to have showcased this masterful artist’s work for almost three decades, and to acknowledge his career as one of Cornwall’s most successful and well-known contemporary artists.

Our Current Falmouth Show- Masters of Colour

Our current exhibition ‘Masters of Colour’ is open from the 10th – 29th March 2017 and celebrates four of our gallery artists and their exceptional use of colour within different mediums. In this collection you can see vibrant paintings by  Myles Oxenford and Richard Tuff along with Paul Jackson’s painterly ceramics and Louisa Taylor’s pastel coloured porcelain vessels.

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Myles Oxenford paintings currently on display in the gallery

Myles lives and works in rural Cornwall where he explores the landscape of his surrounding environment with his dog (who he paints on rainy days) and often his surfboard. He also returns frequently to paint in Scotland, Wales and the Alps.

”In my paintings I want to convey the feeling of sitting in and becoming part of the landscape. I primarily paint outside to capture the light and movement that make the landscape alive to me. By exploring colour and brush marks I am constantly experimenting with different ways of balancing a desire to represent and abstract the Cornish landscape in my work.” – Myles Oxenford

Louisa Taylor’s Crocus Nest of Three Bowls – £350

Conceptually, Louisa’s hand-thrown porcelain vessels draw on museum collections of 18th-century tableware, her modern forms and subtle glazes playing off their antique hand-painted brushwork and dimensions.

As well as form and function, Taylor is especially interested in colour permutation. During her MA studies at the Royal College of Art, she developed a keen interest in coloured stoneware glazes. This started a vast research project that has produced more than 1,000 recipes for new glazes and surface finishes. As a result, she consults as a freelance designer to leading companies in the industry.

“The subtle colour palette of the range is directly influenced by hand painted decoration on historical tureens and grand vessels. I deconstruct each individual colour and match it with glaze. I use the content of the decoration to inform the overall composition of the piece; for example the height of the vessel correlates to the proportion of the colour in the pattern. The intention is to create works that as a whole describe the pattern from where they derived.” – Louisa Taylor

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A view of Richard Tuff’s work within ‘Masters of Colour’ 

Richard Tuff’s paintings have a unique almost child like charm to them. The colours are rich and strong with many subtle changes of light and tone capturing so well on paper the Cornish harbours and towns. He carefully studies the subject matter to be painted and then captures the essence and the feeling of a place, often disregarding the natural order of things.

”I have sought to emphasise the tranquillity of this area with a palette of cool blues and greens, using the gentlest and most harmonious tones to express this sense” – Richard Tuff 

 

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Paul Jackson’s ceramics in our window display 

Paul Jackson decorates his ceramics in a painterly fashion giving each piece a unique and individual character. He starts by hand throwing them on a wheel and often uses white earthenware clay to freely sculpt each ceramic. More recently he has been working with local stoneware and porcelain in a salt glaze kiln, referencing his inspiration from the Cornish landscape.

This show is a must see so don’t miss it.

Great Pottery Throwdown praise for Penzance-based potter

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Wild Cornwall Pots by Catherine Lucktaylor 

BBC Two’s Great Pottery Throwndown came back to our screens in February after a hugely successful first series, attracting over 2 million viewers each week. The show, which many are describing as The Great British Bake Off meets clay, sees ten amateur potters compete to become Top Potter with a number of challenges that range from garden sculpture to a 12-piece porcelain tea set. The third episode of the new series focused on the art of Japenese style ceramics and featured the work of Penzance-based potter Catherine Lucktaylor as a perfect example of how to master the dramatic process of raku-firing.

Raku-firing involves taking pots while they are still glowing red from the kiln and placing them immediately into containers filled with combustible materials. The materials ignite and the containers are closed, producing an intense reduction atmosphere which effects the colours in glazes and clay as well as creating a distinctive cracking due to the drastic thermal shock. The pots are then plunged into cold water to halt the firing process.

Catherine Lucktaylor‘s ‘Wild Cornwall’ series of pots uses the Raku process to create an expressive and colourful finish, reminiscent of flower filled clifftops and swirling seas. Catherine was sought out for the program that showed judge and master potter Keith Brymer Jones holding her pot up from the group of examples to completely focus on her stand-out decoration.

Catherine has been making and experimenting with Raku for over 25 years and was lucky enough to be taught by two well known and respected authorities on Raku during her two-year foundation at Huddersfield Polytechnic and at Wolverhampton Polytechnic as part of her BA Hons in Ceramics. After this she moved to Cardiff and then Brighton, continuing to explore kiln building and Raku, sawdust and pit firings. In 1999, Catherine received a travelling Fellowship from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust and travelled to West Africa and Brazil, creating mixed media sculptural installations as she explored her mixed British-Ghanaian heritage. It was the birth of her son, Leon, in 2007 and another move, to West Cornwall, that led her back to her first love of ceramics. Catherine now specialises in hand built Raku-fired ceramics inspired by the Cornish landscape, which she creates in her large studio near Penzance.

Her work has been exhibited in galleries across the UK, including the Beside The Wave galleries who are celebrating Catherine’s Great Pottery Throwdown feature with a show focusing on her ceramics in their gallery in Falmouth (10th – 30th March). The collection will include brand new work from Catherine’s ‘Wild Cornwall’ series, allowing fans of the show to see Catherine’s textured and bright finishes first hand.We also have another collection of Cornish Mist Pots by Catherine on our website.

For those wishing to find out even more about the process, Catherine runs Raku course and master classes from her studio, details of which can be found on her website.

 

‘Celebration’ a solo exhibition of paintings by Andrew Tozer. Showing in both our galleries in London & Cornwall.

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‘Racing off Flushing’ acrylic on board | 43 x 61 cms | £1,465 |

 

We are excited to announce the opening of Andrew Tozer‘s new exhibition ‘Celebration’ now open in both our Falmouth and London galleries until the 8th March.

The paintings shown in Cornwall celebrate the wonderful Cornish landscape with seascapes of St.Mawes and classic harbour scenes from Mousehole and Falmouth. Whilst the paintings shown in London are a smaller collection of intimate portrayals of the artist’s home farm and family.

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Andrew Tozer’s paintings alongside Peter Hayes sculptures

This show continues to focus on Andrew’s fascination with the cornish landscape and its quality of light and colour with many of his works being created ‘en plein air’:

‘The common link between both collections is one of celebration.  By this I mean that in all the works produced I have attempted to capture a special moment and share it with the viewer. In both collections, many of the works are painted ‘en plein air’ or as some say ‘live’. This process is both immensely challenging and hugely rewarding for me as an artist, as one has to exist simultaneously in the moment one is trying to capture and in the actual painting itself thus creating a unique connection.’Andrew Tozer 

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Andrew Tozer’s paintings alongside Louisa Taylor’s ceramics.

About The Artist

Andrew Tozer was born in Cornwall in 1974. Inspired by art materials found around his parents house he started drawing at a very early age. By fifteen he was sure that becoming a painter was his true calling and at 19 he moved to the capital to study at Westminster University and then on to Central Saint Martins. It was here that he first began to paint outdoors. Taking small sketchbooks and minimal painting materials he would visit Trafalgar Square,Richmond and Kew Gardens.

On graduating Andrew returned to Cornwall and he started to paint the area that he grew up in. Now, Andrew’s paintings record the everchanging nuances of light in his surroundings and his paintings are in the Impressionist tradition. The simplicity and beauty of his work, however, is underpinned by rigorous draftsmanship and the intensity and complexity of his paint handling. His fast, accurate, painterly language becomes clear as thin coats of colour and glazes are applied repeatedly. This is a process that can take months: sites are revisited, paintings adjusted and repainted until a final conclusion is reached.

Andrew Tozer is one of the leading contemporary painters in whose work the legacy of Impressionism resonates: landscapes are expressed with breathtaking immediacy,
fleeting impressions rendered in such a way as to capture the essence of what’s there. His highly collected work has been shown exhibited widely throughout Cornwall and the
UK.

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‘Snowy Walk Through The Woods’  acrylic on board | 30.5 x 46 cms | £945

This show runs until the 8th March 2017 and all of Andrew’s work can be viewed on our website.

With nearly half of this collection selling on the first day of opening this show has already been a huge success and is not to be missed!

Our Valentines Day Gift Guide

img_6192Jewellery by Sarah Perry 

Valentine’s at Beside The Wave

With the most romantic day of the year just around the corner, we’ve made it easy to say ‘I love you’ this Valentine’s day in a truly unique way. We have put together a guide using some of our most precious items in the gallery that would be perfect for a loved one this Valentines day.

Click, call or email with your most loved piece, will we gift wrap and send it to you before Tuesday 14th February.

We hope you enjoy our Valentine’s Gift Guide.

From left to right: Necklace, labradorite, herkimer diamonds and silver, £380 | Rockpool stud earrings, silver, £70  by Emily Nixon

. From left to right: Curl bangle, silver, £295 | Curl giant knot pendant, silver, £180, by Stephanie Johnson

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Large cuff, silver, £295 by Sarah Hyams

Long / short rectangles necklace, silver, £345 by Lucy Spink

 

For him…

 

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Creek Vean
Limited Edition Print of 25, 35 x 35 cm £125 unframed
by Alasdair Lindsay

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Tower Bridge Afternoon Sun,
Limited Edition Print of 25, 35 x 35 cm
£125 unframed
by Alasdair Lindsay

‘Sea Interludes’ a solo exhibition of paintings by Robert Jones featuring new sculptures by Peter Hayes and Reece Ingram 3rd February-15th February 2017.

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Mackerel Fishing, Oil on board, 67 x 61 cm,  £1,950

Our current exhibition ‘Sea Interludes’ features a new collection of paintings by Robert Jones inspired by the musical sequences in Benjamin Britten’s opera Peter Grimes; Jones presents a response to these melodys with the paint itself, using the light to represent changing moods.

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Robert Jones was born in Newquay, Cornwall in 1943. He studied at Falmouth School of Art where he was taught by Francis Hewlett and Robert Organ. The impressions he gained of the area, the changing weather and light, wild seas and skies are a recurring theme in his work; an important formative influence providing the practical and theoretical foundations for his art.

See images of the exhibition below

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Alongside Jones’ paintings in the gallery are exclusive new sculptures by Peter Hayes and Reece Ingram

Here is an interesting excerpt from Jenny Pery’s book : “Robert Jones” which gives and insight into Jones’ concepts and thoughts behind his work.

“The recent series of seas and skies, painted in a format just off the square and reduced to a simple structure of clouds and water meeting over a low
horizon, contain truths about the weather, which can be universally recognised. These are not merely paintings of the sea, but are about the experience
of being at sea. They explore the subtle shifts of wind and water from a close viewpoint; they identify with the sea, seeming to contain symbolic truths
about internal weather, about human moods and feelings. These nuances of mood can hardly be names, but they are nevertheless recognisable as
states of being.
These are paintings made in the studio over a long period of time, which are deliberations on past experience. While the content has been sorted and
sifted, the freshness of touch remains. Each has a specific yet timeless presence. “
Amongst my favourite pieces of music are the Sea Interludes from the Benjamin Britten opera Peter Grimes. These extraordinary compositions
communicate such emotion. The four movements are called: Dawn; Sunday Morning; Moonlight; and Storm; they evoke different sea moods. Water
and light etc, and echo moods within ourselves. I hope the viewer will sense something of this from the different seastates
and moods in the paintings.’

Robert Jones