Erin Ward: January Featured Artist at Beside The Wave Gallery

A spotlight on Acrylic painter Erin Ward. Erin’s paintings are inspired from visits to coastal regions, particularly the East Coast, Cornwall, and Norfolk, spending time walking the coastal paths. Areas where the sea meets the land and rivers, where salt water meets fresh water are a fascination, as well as hard rock against water, the meeting of two extremes.

Erin paints in an energetic, semi-abstract way using a limited palette; often mixing the colours directly onto the canvas, using rags, palette knives and sometimes her fingers, building up the paint from transparent washes to thick impasto in focal areas. We caught up with Erin to find out more about the collection.

Your paintings are full of energy and movement, how do you capture that emotion within your work from memory?

My energetic mark-making is my style which has developed over the years and I find if I am remembering a place, it’s usually from a sense of atmosphere or the weather so it usually works out fine.

What started your connection with Cornwall? Did you visit as a child?

I first visited Cornwall as a child on a family holiday and that memory stayed with me, but it wasn’t until my early twenties when I went on my own and walked the coastal paths did my love for Cornwall really start to develop. I have since returned as often as I can to walk and sketch and soak up the wonderful light and landscape.

What draws you to using acrylic paint in your work?

Acrylics are hugely versatile but are also non-toxic and the artist quality paints use lightfast pigments. They are fantastic to use to create thick impasto areas which still dry quickly but their versatility means that you can also use them in thin layers to give a watercolour effect and also to build up glazes.

They do dry quickly but I also work fairly quickly and it’s a good challenge to get those lovely impasto marks down in one go.

Light Overhead

Light Overhead, Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61 cms, £1,400 – view online

What do you want the viewer to feel from your paintings?

I would love viewers to connect to a sense of atmosphere, and a sense of place in my paintings but mainly I would want them to take away an emotional response.

Do you have a favourite painting within the collection at Beside The Wave Gallery?

That is a difficult question! Each of the pieces in the collection means something different to me but if I could choose two, it would be ‘Empty Beach’ for it’s quiet, calming atmosphere and then ‘Rolling In’ for the dynamic marks, colour and energy, so they are complete opposites!

Rolling InRolling In, Acrylic on canvas, 76.2 x 76.2 cms, £1,950 – view online

Who have been your influences whilst developing your artistic career?

Turner had a very early influence on me. I remember pouring over his watercolour studies for a project in school.

More recently I have been looking at the work of women painters of the Abstract Expressionism movement, in particular, Joan Mitchell, whose work I adore. I think I’m attracted to her energy and movement which plays a big part in my own work.

I also love the work of David Tress, whom I think is one of Britan’s best contemporary landscape artists.

How has your work developed over the years and what direction do you see your work going for the future?

My creative journey has been long and varied and it is only in the past 12 years that I feel my work is going in a direction that I am happy with, although there are still many ups and downs! I tried using acrylics, loved their versatility and ease of use, and as I became comfortable using them as my main medium (I still work in watercolours and oils) my painting flourished. Seascapes, landscape and the weather have always been my main inspiration and this doesn’t show any signs of changing, but I’m finding that my style has become more abstract and my once very limited palette has started to include brighter, richer colours which I’m finding very exciting. I also want to try to capture the energy and motion in my work onto larger canvases and so I have started practising on large pieces of paper first.

Tide Rushing In

Tide Rushing In, Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61 cms, £1,400 – view online

View the full collection of paintings online here.

Benjamin Warner: Influences for Abstract painting collection

Kenneth Warner, Benjamin’s father was a huge influence on his decision to approach abstract work, what started as a collaboration of surfaces has flourished into a huge part of Benjamin’s own artistic practice. In February 2018, Beside the Wave exhibited a collection of abstract paintings by Warner for the very first time across both gallery spaces; the collection received much admiration from collectors old and new.

Benjamin Warner’s abstract paintings are a powerful combination of highly worked surfaces and clever composition which both indicate an almost Abstract Expressionist intention, as well as a constructivist understanding of shape and form. With an innate comprehension of the visual identity of how a painting works, these abstract paintings masterfully adhere to the golden ration. The Golden Ratio has been used as a powerful composition tool for centuries, hailed as ‘the perfect number’, it can assist in creating images that have a strong effect. Benjamin uses this tool as a way of allowing compositional components to speak for themselves and push geometric shapes in and out of focus for the viewer. By using geometric forms but slightly blurring their edges and keeping shapes loose, Benjamin achieves a sense of these floating forms existing across the picture plane. Judging when a piece is finished is a balancing act in the studio for Benjamin, he often leaves paintings for months before returning and finishing them. By achieving what he calls a ‘sense of rhythm and belonging’ this is the marker Benjamin strives for when finishing a piece.

Dance, 30.5 x 46 cm, oil on board, £1,050
Dance, Oil on board, 30.5 x 46 cms, £1,050 – view online

In terms of visual influences, Benjamin takes inspiration from his surroundings whether that is shapes he sees on television programmes or how something is pulled together in landscape. His starting points are incredibly varied but there is always a moment where the painting begins to dictate itself and move away from the original starting point. Not only do their elemental construction reference a formalist approach to painting, Benjamin’s abstracts take influence from the St. Ives artists working through the 1930s- especially Roger Hilton with his palette and then Patrick Heron with his shapes. With an emphasis on materiality, simple line and accentuated forms, both the St. Ives painters and Warner prioritise the construction of a painting as very much on show, there is no illusion and the painting becomes its own visual history with densely built layers of oils.

Click Clack, 30.5 x 43.5 cm, oil on board, £995
Click Clack, Oil on Board, 30.5 x 43.5 cms, £995 – view online

The roughened quality of not only the paint application but also surface material, allows Benjamin to produce paintings where there is a unification between artist and artwork. There is an implication that Warner works with the surface instead of dictatorially working on the surface which exposes a truly intuitive handling of medium. With both the act of painting and unpainting (removing), Warner’s work insists on a sense of longevity and timelessness which allows the viewer to experience the painting as an autonomous object- existing with its own essence. By often scraping layers of paint back, Benjamin’s work carries a trace or a ghost of what has gone before it therefore giving it a more impactful final effect. With the lack of concrete subject matter, the paintings could be deemed a surface level, modern creation; however, Warner does not disregard the historical codes and conventions of the painting model. In fact, he uses many tools such as impasto, colour theory and traditional application which reveal his complex understanding of the painting world. Through adapting these methods and tools slightly to his own approach and the removal of an obvious subject matter, Benjamin’s abstracts allow for a more sublime, emotional response. This is then often emphasised by the titling of the work, both constructed before and after a painting is made, the language Benjamin uses is both poetic and descriptive. Either derived from real place names or from an emotional experience, the titles act as a nudge in the right direction for the viewer rather than explicitly signposting-they give them an identity without dictating a prescriptive viewing.

Balance and tension are both present in these abstract pieces, with sliding forms buffering against one in another in slight tonal differences, the paintings ask the viewer to fill in the gaps with their own imagination and experience. Colour, although not vivid or primary, plays a strong role in Benjamin’s work as it acts as a vehicle to reference things in our surrounding world. By splitting composition through colour and line, Warner’s work also holds a textile quality, sharing characteristics with artists such as Sandra Blow with her woven like compositions in similar colours that profoundly blurred the lines between object and painting. Both Warner and Blow, use colour as a way of producing abstract, geometric pictures which emphasise patterns, tones and shapes found in the elemental world. Benjamin’s work shows a substantial comprehension of the need for varied pigmentation and saturation within a painting, he does this by using umbers and ochres across the background and middle ground which is then often dramatically altered with the interruption of a blue or orange gesture. With this combination of muted earth tones and an occasional vibrant insertion, Benjamin’s work can speak of the landscape he exists in, both urban and natural. There is also a balance between Warner’s abstract and representational work, each practice informs the other and allows Benjamin to move forward with both sets of paintings. The abstract work allows for a more in-depth experimentation and learning curve in terms of material and surface which then can be translated into the representational works, they keep each other fresh and exciting.

Spatial I (Green)

Spatial I (Green), Oil on board, 15 x 14 cms, £395 – view online

The idea that a piece of art can both reference the visual world we live in through abstract forms which we recognise, but also can avoid being too indicative of specificities and box viewers in, is not a new revelation. However, we believe abstract art has become even more relevant in our ever-changing world. With the over stimulation of visual imagery and an instantaneous culture, abstract art acts as the reminder that we can exist in a slower and more indefinite manner. Benjamin Warner’s work is an intense yet generous dialogue between colour and form, both of which are always rooted in him as a person and what he visually encounters in his everyday life. He is an artist of our time that is saving abstraction from a clinical or remote dynamic and is instead lurching it towards association and emotion.

View the full collection of Benjamin Warner Abstract Paintings available at Beside The Wave Gallery online here.

‘Adrian Hemming: Rough Seas for Mermaids’

screen-shot-2017-01-31-at-15-23-56
‘Dreaming of Mermaids’, oil on canvas, 67 x 153 cm, by Adrian Hemming

Currently on display at Beside The Wave London, we are very excited to be hosting our first solo exhibition for acclaimed artist Adrian Hemming.

The collection, the second in the artist’s series of blue works, stems from an almost twenty-year fascination with a particular ultramarine:

‘Ultramarine Blue is the blue of the Medieval Church, it’s the blue of the Virgin Mary, it’s the blue of the Princes and Popes of the Renaissance. It is the perfect blue made by grinding up the semi-precious stone Lapis Lazuli, and purifying it by a complex and difficult process. Sometimes referred to as True Blue, it was and still is one of the more expensive pigments (although now it is made from a chemical process). But I love it. I found my blue, called A19, in the form of big fat crayons manufactured by the Unison Company. I now buy kilo bags of the pure pigment A19 and make my own oil and watercolours. Originally I used it to represent the total blue sky of the Australian series. The Deluge painting demanded it and so this single colour has acquired more and more significance, culminating in the present show. It’s paean to an ancient colour.’ Extract from ‘In conversation with Dr. Paul Williamson, Director V & A Museum’.

img_6102

With the first series of blue works influenced by travels around the Mediterranean Sea, the starting point for this series is a more abstract one:

‘First and foremost, the paintings are about blue before they are about Sea and Sky. The iconography of the works is based on chance and accident. The format of the works is as simple as I can make it, sometimes a halfway division leaving two blocks of richly worked blue on top and bottom of the canvas. The wonder is that, despite this non-figurative approach, it still recalls to the onlooker Visceral memories of places and events that they may have experienced.’ Adrian Hemming, 2017

img_6016
Artist Adrian Hemming and gallery manager Claire Pearce at the private view

Adrian Hemming was born in Leicester in 1945. Following an apprenticeship as an engineer he travelled widely in Europe and developed an appreciation of landscape and a love of art.

On returning to England, Adrian was accepted onto the Foundation Course at Lincoln College of Art. His B.A. was completed at Brighton Polytechnic (1973) and his M.A. at Goldsmiths College, London University (1982).

He co-founded Tichbourne Studios in Brighton and later founded the Angel Studios in London. He went on to establish Southgate Studios in the East End where he has been painting full time since 1990.

Adrian has twice been short-listed for the Artist in Residence at the National Gallery, London. He has lectured and exhibited widely in England, Scotland, America and South Africa. His work can be found in many private and public collections as well as being on public view in Terminal One, Heathrow Airport, as a result of a major commission by BAA.

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-13-22-00

The show runs until Wednesday 15th February 2017 and all of the work is also available to view on our website.

We highly recommend seeing theses incredible, expressive works in person, transforming our space into a mesmerising vault of blue.

Our New Year’s Resolution

With the fresh New Year now upon us, we wanted to kickstart our blog again and what better way to start than a look back at all of our most liked Instagram posts from both Beside the Wave Cornwall and Beside The Wave London from 2016 – catching us up to today and celebrating some of our favourite work from the year.

Richard Tuff: Harbours & Houses

Screen Shot 2016-05-14 at 11.54.58
Paintings and drawings by Richard Tuff

We are very pleased to announce the opening of a wonderful new collection by Richard Tuff at Beside The Wave Cornwall. This spectacular collection visits some of Cornwall’s most loved harbours and more hidden beaches and valleys. His beautiful use of colour evokes emotional responses to his charming compositional pieces.

Richard Tuff was born in Manchester in 1965. He completed a Foundation Art Course at Mid Cheshire College of Art in 1985 and went on to gain a Degree in Textile Design at Winchester School Of Art, showing his final year work at the Smiths Gallery, Covent Garden. After a highly successful time working as a textile designer, with his designs used for the textile industry in America, Europe and Japan, Richard moved to Cornwall at the end of 1988 and since then has concentrated on his paintings.

Richard Tuff’s paintings have a unique almost child like charm to them. His jewel-like colours are rich and strong with many subtle changes of light and tone capturing so well on paper the Cornish harbours and towns. He carefully studies the subject matter to be painted and then captures the essence and the feeling of a place, often disregarding the natural order of things.

Richard Tuff has been represented by Beside The Wave since 1989 where he has developed a strong following of collectors from across the UK. His work is shown in solo exhibitions in both Beside The Wave Cornwall and Beside The Wave London.

‘Richard Tuff: Harbours & Houses’ runs at Beside The Wave Cornwall from today until 26th May 2016.